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Thomas Crow

February - June 2011

Thomas Crow is the Rosalie Solow professor of modern art, and associate provost for the arts at New York University. Previously he served as Director of the Getty Research Institute, during which time there were frequent scholarly and program collaborations with the Clark. He has published two studies of eighteenth-century French painting: Painters and Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Paris (1985) and Emulation: Making Artists for Revolutionary France (1995). Subsequent publications, including The Rise of the Sixties: American and European Art in the Era of Dissent and the essay collection, Modern Art in the Common Culture (both 1996), examine the later twentieth century, while The Intelligence of Art (1999) analyzes specific moments in the history of art history. Crow’s most recent texts focus on single artists, including Gordon Matta-Clark (2003), Robert Smithson (2004), Robert Rauschenberg (2005), Jasper Johns, Ed Ruscha (both 2008), Harry Smith, Andy Warhol, and Bob Dylan (all 2009). He has also continued to do research on eighteenth-century France with recent published essays on Chardin in the context of French religious conflicts and the thematics of exile in the later work of David. His project at the Clark will be the completion of a book on the character and persistence of Pop Art from its antecedents in the 1950s to its resilient reappearances in a variety of media up to the present.

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